A lot of us plant our gardens during the spring and summer months in order to have fresh vegetables for our families. Although you may not call this “organic,” that’s exactly what it is if you’re not using chemical enhancers to assist you. Find out what else you can do to enjoy an organic garden by reading these tips.

Composting for organic gardening reduces the need for fertilizers, is a form of herbicide, can help prevent plant diseases and helps impact the environment in positive ways. Composting is a source of nutrition for insects, helps with soil erosion and reduces waste sent to landfills. It is wonderful for the health of the environment in general.

A great rule of thumb to follow when planting an organic garden is less is more. While you’ll want to plant a little more than you think you will need in case of rot or pests, you don’t want to overdo it because you’ll end up with much more than you can handle.

Blend flowering fruit shrubs into your regular landscape. Don’t have a separate area to turn into a garden? Elderberries, blueberries and currants have pretty flowers in springtime and look great in the fall as well. The side benefit of these landscape-enhancing plants is all the fruit they produce for you to enjoy.

The best way to water your organic garden is to use a soaker hose. Soaker hoses not only conserve water, but also direct the water exactly where it needs to go, into the dirt, rather than on the leaves and into the air. By watering the leaves, you leave your plants susceptible to fungus growth.

To keep rodents, deer, and other pesky animals away from your organic garden, use organic repellents. A spray made from hot peppers can be effective. Otherwise try a spray containing urine or rotten eggs. Regardless of what you use, apply the sprays liberally and reapply regularly especially after a rain shower.

For indoor organic gardening, temperature control is very important during the early phases. Seventy degrees Fahrenheit is the ideal temperature for most seeds to start growing. You can achieve this temperature relatively easily by installing heaters and placing the seeds near the vents. You can also purchase heat mats to place under your plant containers.

In your organic garden, try using floating row covers to prevent moths from laying eggs on your plants. Floating row covers, which are made from lightweight material that has been specially designed to allow light and water to penetrate it, can be used as an effective cover for your plants to stop moths from laying eggs. This helps to protect your plants from caterpillar damage later in the growing season.

Rotate your crops to prevent permanent populations of pests in your garden. As with any ecosystem, pests need a certain amount of time to nest and build up a proper population within a garden. These pests are specially suited for one environment and one food source. By switching their food source you can essentially keep your pest population down simply because they are unable to adapt to the new type of plant.

While caring for your organic garden involves many big, day-long tasks, it also calls for smaller jobs that need to be performed more frequently. Keep a good handle on the minor needs of your garden so that you can make good use of brief periods of free time. When you have a few minutes to spare, why not use them weeding, pruning or performing other garden maintenance tasks?

Collecting and recycling rain water is a great way to save money and help your garden bloom. Rain water is generally cleaner and freer of pollutants and contaminants than ground water or city water. Collect the rain in rain barrels or cisterns so that you can use it whenever it is needed.

When running your organic garden, you should use the “shovel method” to eliminate weeds. This method does not eliminate all of the weeds at one time because doing this is ineffective. This method uses a sharp spade to turn the weeds over and bury the leaves. When the leaves rot, the weeds will actually provide nourishment to the soil.

Cover bare spots when you plant. When you put a new plant into your organic garden, do not leave the earth bare where you planted. Make sure you mulch the area all around your new plant. This will protect it while it begins to grow. This will also keep the ground moist.

You don’t just have to plant things that are going to be eaten by you in your organic garden. Try planting some flowers too. You can use annuals for one-season color. You do not want to use everywhere though since replacing a lot of them can be very expensive. Try planting them in a few small areas.

Organic gardening does not have to involve very hard work or deep digging in the dirt. If you use things like compost or soil amendments, then you don’t have to work the soil so deeply. Besides, you can find most of a plant’s roots in the top six inches of soil.

People often do not realize that organic gardening can be quite easy. Many people gardening with the aid of chemicals fail to realize the benefits of going organic. Make sure you’re ready to use the tips you’ve learned here to get the most out of your garden. You might even inspire a few others to do the same!